Want to improve wellness in pregnancy, address gender injustice

#genderinequality #maternalhealth #storytelling #digitaldivide

United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has released its "State of World Population Report 2020" highlighting the scale and pervasiveness of gender injustice and stereotyping in the world today. The statistics are appalling and makes me at times wonder in despair why we continue to be stuck in medieval attitudes, beliefs and practices in the 21st century.

UNFPA advocates for a world where every woman and girl should be free to chart her own future. That’s a no brainer and why not! Yet, as the report highlights the reality is quite different. Causative factors are detailed in the report, and some of these are that we experience in Kushal day to day and work towards. For example, when we speak to family members of pregnant women, we are often told,

“Why does she have to learn what happens to her body in pregnancy? My mother and aunt live with us. They tell her what to do. They are who should make decisions for her and for us as a couple.”

It’s easy to get upset and react angrily. But to change mindsets of those who hold power and deny bodily autonomy demands patience. It can’t be done by sermonising, which is why we rely on story-telling, an effective tool for social change and by engaging male members of the family.

The report also presents data from 57 countries, stating that only 55 per cent of women aged 15 to 49 years who are married or in a union make their own decisions about sexual relations and the use of contraceptives and reproductive health services (UNFPA, 2020). We have some preliminary data to this affect as well, and continue to monitor so that we can come up with innovative ways and approaches to address gender related barriers.

For those who would like to know more about gender-biased sex selection, Female Genital Cutting and child marriage the report is a good read. However, I would have liked for the report to articulate strongly enough how and why it is essential to also address the digital divide in today’s world. To make a better case for leveraging technology effectively in order to facilitate autonomy, decision making and wellness in women.

You can also read Prof. Maya Unnithan's commentary who heads Centre for Cultures of Reproduction, Technologies and Health (CORTH) at Sussex University. She concludes by pointing out,

"Although rights have arrived, justice has not followed!"

"Men as husbands, fathers, policymakers, healthcare providers need to use their privilege to redress gender discrimination for greater social justice."

How to prevent bleeding gums in pregnancy

Good oral hygiene is a must during pregnancy for a healthy baby.

Bleeding gums during pregnancy

It is quite common to hear of bleeding gums in pregnancy. Pregnant women want to know how to prevent and avoid problems in relation to teeth and oral health.

In fact, nearly 60 - 75% of pregnant women have gingivitis, an early stage of periodontal disease (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, USA). Reports suggest that pregnant women are 7 times at higher risk. In gingivitis, the gums become red and swollen. Changing hormones during pregnancy are responsible for the condition but it gets worse as a result of poor dental hygiene practices that lead to plaque and debris. If untreated, the bone that supports teeth gets brittle and gums get infected. Though we do not know for certain the reasons for adverse pregnancy outcomes, periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight.

Another complaint often heard is that of a small rounded tumour like growth in the gums between teeth. Commonly called pregnancy tumour, it can bleed when brushing teeth or eating. A pregnancy tumour usually disappears after the baby is born.If it persists after child birth you must visit a dentist.

Morning sickness especially when severe can erode the enamel in your teeth. That happens because of exposure of teeth to gastric juices and acids as a result of reflux. Increased exposure to acidity is a cause for tooth decay too.

To keep your teeth and gums healthy -

1. Brush your teeth twice day with a floured toothpaste.
2. If you have morning sickness, don't brush straight away after throwing up. Wait for an hour or so and then brush your teeth.
3. Daily salt rinse your mouth - 1 tsp of salt added to a cup of water. Swirl the wash a few times in your mouth and then spit it out. Avoid mouthwashes that contain alcohol.
4. Floss once a day.

X-rays including dental x-rays should be avoided in pregnancy. If unavoidable, an LED apron with coat and neck collar must be worn to prevent radiation exposure to the abdominal region and thyroid glands. However, it is safe to get dental treatment during the second trimester of pregnancy.

Always consult your doctor when in doubt.

Sravani
Vijaywada
10 June 2020

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